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Landscape Conservation


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Landscape Conservation


WildLandscapes International works to empower local partners to conserve globally important North American landscapes. This collaboration involves ranching communities, Native peoples, sportsmen, foresters, fisherfolk, local governments, and conservation organizations.

Our work in North America is both an intensive and long-term effort for delivering substantial and lasting results. We focus on investing in rural and Native economies, conserving wide-ranging wildlife such as elk, caribou, pronghorn, and pelagic fish, birds, and cetaceans, restoring endangered species, and developing resiliency strategies to protect landscapes and wildlife from the effects of climate change.

WildLandscapes currently works in Alaska, the Malheur-Sheldon-Hart landscape in the Great Basin, and the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.

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Alaska


Alaska


Goal:

Establish wildlife corridors between National Parks and Wildlife Refuges of the Alaskan Arctic to allow for natural migration of wide-ranging wildlife and fish. Facilitate collaboration between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Native people to maintain healthy populations of polar bears and four species of eider ducks.

Strategy and Outcomes:

WildLandscapes is partnering with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Alaska guides and outfitters, sportspeople, and Native people, to develop a robust in-state Alaska constituency for public lands through investment in ecotourism to benefit rural economies, Native villages, and wildlife.

To this end, we are developing and implementing an innovative, ecotourism-based conservation strategy for Alaska on six of its National Wildlife Refuges. Elements of our strategy include:

  • Securing public funding to invest in visitor infrastructure on Alaska National Wildlife Refuges.

  • Establishing the Alaska Refuge Bear Circuit – a world-class ecotourism opportunity to see all three of North America's bear species in a 10-day expedition.

  • Collaborating with Native peoples, private investors, and an ecolodge manager to establish an ecolodge adjacent to one of Alaska’s premier National Wildlife Refuges. The ecolodge will provide visitors with the opportunity to view large concentrations of waterfowl, brown bears, abundant salmon runs, and marine life including walrus and grey whales.

Investments in ecotourism, infrastructure, and visitor opportunities will yield economic gains for rural Alaskans, Native people, guides, outfitters, sportspeople, birdwatchers, and tourism-oriented businesses. These diverse stakeholders have credibility with local lawmakers and can become a powerful in-state voice for Alaska public lands.

Partners:

 
 

Alaska Venture Fund

 
 Alaska National Wildlife Refuges

Alaska National Wildlife Refuges

 
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National Elk Refuge


Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

National Elk Refuge


Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

Goal:

Establish a 10,000-acre conservation area to maintain healthy populations of elk and bison, protect the ranching way of life, and safeguard businesses dependent on the Jackson Hole elk herd.

Strategy and Outcomes:

WildLandscapes is working in partnership with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to develop a strategy for managing elk and bison populations wintering on National Elk Refuge. Together with local ranchers, sportspeople, and other stakeholders, we are exploring the possibility of acquiring conservation easements from willing sellers, which would prevent development and allow for grazing of elk and bison during winter months.

The expanded grazing area would decrease crowding and disease transmission of the Jackson Hole elk and bison herds, as well as of pronghorn antelope and deer. A potential outcome of this project is the creation of a 10,000-acre conservation area funded by the Land and Water Conservation Fund, Farm Bill, and private philanthropy. The work in Jackson can be replicated in other key wintering areas of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.

Partners:

 
 National Elk Refuge

National Elk Refuge