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International Consulting


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International Consulting


The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Department of State, USAID, and private U.S. foundations account for almost 90% of conservation funding available abroad. Yet grassroots organizations implementing some of the most impactful international conservation often lack capacity in the U.S. These organizations are unable to take advantage of U.S. government funding or of philanthropy hubs such as New York, Florida, and California to raise the funds necessary to reach the conservation goals of the globally important landscapes in which they work.

WildLandscapes International has identified this capacity gap as a significant impediment to sustainable grassroots conservation. We work to fill this gap through partnering with groundbreaking grassroots conservation organizations to provide capacity and expertise in fundraising, public finance, and landscape conservation that is often transferable across international boundaries.

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Laikipia, Kenya


Laikipia, Kenya


WildLandscapes International is partnering with Ol Pejeta and Mutara Conservancies and local stakeholders to develop a vision, strategy, and to secure resources for a 22,000-acre rhino reserve, working towards a 209,000-acre conservation project in Laikipia. This landscape is critical to restore East African black rhinos and other endangered species such as Grevy's zebras, African wild dogs, and Temminck’s pangolins.

WildLandscapes International is assisting Laikipia Wildlife Forum and Ol Pejeta Conservancy in an effort to develop a regional wildlife strategy to better coordinate conservancies and other landowners in Laikipia for managing wide-ranging wildlife such as elephants, East African black rhinos, lions, and African wild dogs across 3.5 million acres of globally significant wildlife habitat.

Partners:

 
 
 
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Northeast India


 

 

Northeast India


 

 

WildLandscapes International is partnering with the University of Florida to develop a science-based reserve design to help safeguard the globally significant biological hotspot of Northeast India, protecting the world’s largest populations of Bengal tigers, Asian elephants, one-horned rhinos, and a stunning bird diversity.

Kaziranga National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is the focal point of this project. The reserve design will develop corridors and new protected areas to allow wildlife to migrate in and out of the National Park. Conserving this region is key to the watershed of the mighty Brahmaputra River that drains into the vast mangrove forests of the Sundurbans.

Partners:

 
 Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation

Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation